Bail Bondsman – Things to know

Interested in being a bondman on bail? Would you like to know more about the profession and see if you have the right career? Here is an interview with a bail bondman who shares his views on his work and his experiences. Hope his answers help you analyse this choice for your career and find out if it is right for you. -check this

What is it that you do for a living?

I am a bondman, an agent of bail bonds, to be correct.

How can you explain what you’re doing there?

I ‘m trying to bond people out, and bring them back in prison.

What does it involve your job?

On a regular basis, I deal with criminals. With their families, I deal with them. With their problems, I deal. For all, I deal. I’m making sure that they go to court. I must go find them and either make a new court date or bring them back in jail if they don’t turn up to court.

Rapid reality!

How to become a bondman on bail?

You have to have a squeaky, clean record to begin with. Then you have to take a test to get started and get funded by a bonding agency.

We have rotating schedules where this office has several agents and we rotate on a 24-hour shift. I’m there every 3 days. I come in in between to skip trace (aka bounty hunting).

How did you start off?

A long time ago, I used to do this and I actually did it part-time and with my master’s degree in nursing, I went to school full-time and decided that I wanted a real job and went to nursing and worked for 11 years, hated it and then returned to bonding.

What do you like when it comes to being a bondman?

If you have any of these individuals who are messing up with their life and all of a sudden you see them turn around, the rewards will be. There’s a kind of trust you have to build with your clients, and if you’re a hard-ass with them, chances are they won’t want to go to court. They will not step up for you as well. So it’s kind of satisfying when you reach out to support one person and it makes a difference in their life.

What would you dislike?

People are lying right in my face. We label frequent flyers, the repeat offenders, who you just keep going on a limb for, and they keep letting you down. The fear of forfeiture is still there. Since our client did not go to court and we have to pay the bail, you have to go in front of a judge. So we are asking the judge for mercy to get an extension to find this person.