Information About Drinking and Driving in College

Drunk driving is the leading cause of death for young people aged 15 to 24, so teaching your youth about the risks of drinking and driving is important, not just for their own safety but also for the safety of all road users and pedestrians.

Many parents make the first mistake in this field by assuming that they do not need to bring up the topic before their own teens learn to drive. You don’t have to get behind the wheel of a vehicle to recognise the risks of drunk driving, and the more you tell your children about it, the more often the lectures will last. view more

When it comes to the effects of drunk driving, teens must thoroughly comprehend what it is to kill another human on the road, as well as the crippling consequences for their families and friends. However, they must also recognise that many people are killed as a result of drunk driving, and they and their family may be forced to deal with the effects of serious injuries for the remainder of their life. This is not necessarily easy for a teenager to grasp, but it is an important lesson for them to remember.

It’s also important for adolescents to comprehend the ramifications of being found driving while inebriated. So, learn about the state’s drunk driving regulations and make sure you understand the implications of an arrest. Explain to them that a DUI arrest would not only put them in prison, but will also jeopardise their job chances.

Today, against your best intentions, your teenager may find himself in the situation of having had too much to drink while driving and being forced to choose between driving the car home when he realises he is not ready to do so or calling you and being screamed at for being too reckless. As a result, you’ll need to talk to him about this before it happens.

Remember that we all make mistakes as children, and the most important thing is to stay alive, learn from our mistakes, and live and try again the next time. So, if your child is in this situation, he needs to know that he can call you at any time of day or night to come pick him up, regardless of his condition.

This isn’t to say you don’t think he should be disciplined for his irresponsibility or that you think he shouldn’t get drunk. But the first task is to keep him safe and convince him that asking for help was the right, rational, and mature thing to do.